Exceptor

Posted by admin | Diets & Dieting,Just Food Articles - writers invited | Monday 28 September 2009 11:07 pm

Now this is a new one for me. I just read it in the Sunday Times (of India, that is).

    Who is an Exceptor?
    An exceptor is a person who chooses to eat meat on special occasions. A vegetarian by habit, the exceptor makes exceptions for days like weddings, festivals and celebrations. After the vegan, eggetarian and flexitarian, it is the exceptor who is basically vegetarian, but makes changes in diet to suit the occasion.

Incidently I don’t find this word in any online dictionary.
Ahem! Wonder if it works the other way round. I think I’m a non-vegetarian exceptor, who makes changes in diet to be vegetarian when I don’t really have a choice, such as office lunch times.

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…and more about Breakfast

Posted by admin | Diets & Dieting,Health Facts,Just Food Articles - writers invited | Thursday 3 July 2008 10:21 pm

Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper. – Adelle Davis

breakfastWhile so many studies into nutrition seem to contradict each other – this is one issue that seems certain. Breakfast is good!
Breakfast is a meal that sets you up for the day. It replenishes your body’s energy supply after the nights fast and provides the energy required to stay physically and mentally alert. Without breakfast, your body is basically running on empty. It is a critical meal for adults and children alike.
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Children who eat breakfast perform better on standardized achievement tests and have fewer behavior problems in school.
A Harvard University/Massachusetts General Hospital study of children in Philadelphia and Baltimore schools discovered that students who usually ate school breakfast had improved math grades, reduced hyperactivity, decreased absence and tardy rates, and improved psycho-social behaviors compared with children who rarely ate school breakfast. (Pediatrics, January 1998; Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, February, 1998)
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Now when did I last have breakfast? ! Eating breakfast can do wonders for your memory loss. A study done by the University of Toronto on healthy men and women in the age group 60 to 79 showed that taking in calories from either protein, carbohydrates or fat boosted their performance in memory tests. While it appears that any breakfast is better than no breakfast at all, researchers have found that carbohydrates generally fuel the best long-term benefits to memory, probably due to the rise in blood sugar that they cause. Rise in blood sugar then causes an increase in the supply of glucose to the brain. (more…)

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Tandoori Diet?

Posted by admin | Diets & Dieting,Just Food Articles - writers invited,Meat,Poultry | Tuesday 27 May 2008 4:59 am

If you’re on diet and you just have to go out to dinner at a restaurant that serves Indian food, chances are the most healthy thing on the menu probably is the Tandoori Chicken.

Three people wrote in to say I’d forgotten the most interesting thing about Tandoori Chicken. That its good for dieters.
Hmm, maybe, but well I’m going to modify that a bit here.
If you’re on diet and you absolutely have to go out to dinner at a restaurant that serves Indian food, chances are the most healthy thing on the menu probably is the Tandoori Chicken. Dieticians suggest it. It will definately have less fat on it and in it than any other dish. I’ve seen dieting friends order a full Tandoori Chicken, where they would have otherwise had a leg piece, and then pat themselves on the back. Get real. Look at your plate. Use your head. Er, and skip the ghee on the Roti.

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Italian for ice-cream

Posted by admin | Diets & Dieting,Just Food Articles - writers invited | Friday 6 July 2007 1:25 am

The big thing about movie multi-plexes these days is the fact that the movie watching is really the least important thing to do there. You can play pool, buy shoes, (or clothes, or watches, or candy) and of course eat, drink, buy books and generally hang out with friends. Unfortunately to the sound of head-banging music(?).
The one round the corner from my place also has a counter for a local brand of Gelato called Ti-Amo, Pune’s only gelato brand for the moment. I’m not an ice-cream fan at all, give me cheese cake any day, but this stuff is absolutely lip-smacking.

Six months back I hadn’t even the word. But now it’s the latest fad in ice-cream, though as all the interesting signage would tell you, it isn’t ice-cream at all and it isn’t sinful or something you need to watch your diet with.

Gelato is a generic Italian word for ice cream. The same word is commonly used in English speaking countries to refer to ice cream that is prepared the Italian way. During the preparation of Gelato the ingredients are super-cooled while stirring to break up any ice crystals as they form. The result is a smooth and creamy texture even though it contains hardly any cream! It also has less than 35% air that leaves you with a dense and extremely flavourful concoction. It is made with the freshest of fruit and other yummy ingredients imported straight from

The best part is that Gelato contains only 5–10% fat! ( I got this off their site, so if you want to know more, you should check it out.

Ti-Amo, which incidently means “I love you” in Italian, has been started by Gauri Nafrey and her husband, both finance professionals, who packed up their lucrative careers in London, to follow their hearts and their stomachs.

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…more surfing

Posted by admin | Diets & Dieting,Just Food Articles - writers invited | Wednesday 4 April 2007 1:30 am

The problem with the picky way kids eat today isn’t kids – it’s parents and a society that sets kids apart as a “separate species who require a different diet from the rest of us.

The Problem with Kids Today Ruth Reichl’s Letter from the Editor in the current (March 2007) issue of Gourmet magazine hits a bull’s-eye. She warns that she’s going to rant, and she does it extremely well in the course of doing the right thing: The problem with the picky way kids eat today isn’t kids – it’s parents and a society that sets kids apart as a “separate species who require a different diet from the rest of us.”
YAY! I cheered as I read it. About a month or so ago, I wrote here in this blog that I was ticked off by the notion that kids simply don’t like certain foods. Sure, I know it’s tough to deal with a recalcitrant 5-year-old at dinner time who demands mac-and-cheese and won’t eat anything but mac-and-cheese… Read more…

Junk food ad rules too watered down, say health groups
…”They will still allow cartoon characters to promote unhealthy foods during Coronation Street and Dancing on Ice, so how will this make a difference?” she said. “With an escalating obesity crisis we can’t afford to wait another couple of years before stepping in.”… Read more.

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