New Foodie Words

Posted by admin | | Friday 4 January 2008 11:55 pm

There’s a lot of food terms and words out there that I either had never heard of till recently, or had heard of, even used, but didn’t know what they meant for sure. Or I just got to know something new or interesting about them. Some of them are really simple, once I learnt them, I bump into them everywhere, so they’re obviously not new to everyone.

Here’s a list. There’s no reason or order to it. But it makes for interesting reading.

Do write in to add more words at thefoodies@gmail.com

EXCEPTOR
An exceptor is a person who chooses to eat meat on special occasions. A vegetarian by habit, the exceptor makes exceptions for days like weddings, festivals and celebrations. After the vegan, eggetarian and flexitarian, it is the exceptor who is basically vegetarian, but makes changes in diet to suit the occasion.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ZESTED (zĕst)
The outermost part of the rind of an orange, lemon, or other citrus fruit, chopped very fine and used as flavoring. The art is to remove the peel without he white part, – the pith, – because that is bitter.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PASTA
Everytime I come across a Pasta recipe with a kind of pasta mentioned, other than the usual Penne, Lasagne, Cannelloni etc, I’m stumped. Came across this list so I thought I should add it…
Basic Pasta Shapes & Sizes
Angel Hair – Very thin/fine spaghetti which literally cooks in a minute or two, good for seafood
Cannelloni – big, round tubes, can be thought of as “jumbo” ziti and better for stuffing with ricotta chesse
Cappellini – Thicker than angel hair, thinner than Spaghetti or Spaghetini, some argue it is the same as angel hair.
Capo da Chef – Thick, wide-ridged rigatoni-like shaped pasta with one end curled to look like a chef’s hat
Creste Di Galli – Half moon shaped pasta with 2 rows of holes, it is named for the zodiac and/or constellation Gemini, (the Twins) and can also look like 2-thick walled pastas twisted together.
Ditalini – short tubes about the size of the eraser on the end of a pencil, most commonly seen in soups like pasta fragioli
Farfalle – look and are commonly referred to as bowties
Farfallone – Butterfly-shaped pasta
Fettucine – Long, thin, flat pasta
Fuisilli – Looks like spaghetti with a “perm”, as it is curly/kinky as if you had wrapped it around a pencil. Sometimes mistaken for Rotini pasta, but rotini has a longer, corkscrew type shape.
Gnocchi – pasta made with potatoes
Lasagna – Long, flat, wide pasta (if it is filled with meat sauce, as opposed to just ricotta, it is known as Sicilian style)
Linguine – Long, very think flat pasta that looks more like spaghetti than fettucine.
Linguine Fini – Thinner than regular linguine
Manicotti – about the thickness of a crepe, but almost like a pancake
Orzo – easily can be mistaken for rice, they work best in soups
Penne – literally means “pen” in Italian because of the angled tip, it resembles a fountain pen.
Penne Rigate – pen shaped pasta as described above, only has ridges
Quadrefiore – “square flower” shape
Radiatore – “little radiators” shaped like what you have in the front of your car, square with coils
Ravioli – ravioli always contains some sort of “filling”, it is two pieces of flat dough, a few inches (square or round, sometimes even in the shape of a fish or heart) and while most commonly filled with ground meat or ricotta, it can also be filled with everything from exotic mushrooms to walnuts, artichokes and other vegetables, as well as seafood.
Rosette – rose-shaped pasta on one side, and wagon wheel on the other
Rotini is often mistaken with fuisilli pasta, but rotini has a longer, corkscrew type shape.
Shells – Look like shells, coming in most commonly small, medium and large. Only medium or large should be considered for being stuffed, perhaps with ricotta cheese
Spaghetti – Long, thin, round pasta, and without a doubt the most popular size/type in the United States.
Spaghettini – Thin spaghetti, similar to vermicelli
Tortellini – Literally means the navel or bellybutton of Venus.
Tubetti – Similar to Ziti, only “cut up” into smaller pieces which then resemble ditalini
Vermicelli – Thin spaghetti, similar to spaghetini
Ziti – plain tubes, no ridges, most commonly baked in meat sauce with mozzarella covering it.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

TEMPEH tĕm’pā’
n. A high-protein food of Indonesian origin made from partially cooked, fermented soybeans.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SEITEN sā’tăn’
n. A chewy, protein-rich food made from wheat gluten and used as a meat substitute.
And since I wasn’t to sure of what gluten was either, …it’s a ‘mixture of plant proteins occurring in cereal grains, chiefly corn and wheat, used as an adhesive and as a flour substitute’.
Vegan’s seem to have it in a lot of their recipes.

Here’s wikipedia’s description.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HULL hŭl

a. The dry outer covering of a fruit, seed, or nut; a husk. ( for example maize or coconut )
b. The enlarged calyx of a fruit, such as a strawberry, that is usually green and easily detached.
tr.v., hulled, hull·ing, hulls.
To remove the hulls of (fruit or seeds).

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DARIOLE MOULDS
dariole_mouldsA small metal mould about 8cm high with a narrower bottom than top. Dariole moulds are used for a variety of individual portion-sized servings of food including puddings, sweet or savoury mousses and jellies and for portions of rice or mashed potato. Dariole moulds are also known as madeleine tins.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PANCETTA păn-chĕt’a
This is an Italian bacon that has been cut from the belly of the pig, rolled and cured in salt and spices, and then air-dried, but usually not smoked. Its taste and shape are quite unique. Unlike North American-style strip bacon, Pancetta is not usually served as part of breakfast. Instead it is used to flavour other dishes, – diced, fried and sprinkled on a Caesar salad or mixed in into pastas, omelettes, soups or risotto. The fat from the Pancetta is even used to cook vegetables, – onions, garlic and bell peppers.
Try this delicious Cheesy Mushroom and Pancetta Lasagna recipe.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MARINARA ma·ri·na·ra
A delicious sauce of tomatoes, onions, garlic, and spices. Basically of Italian origin. The word is also used as a prefix to various dish names. Marinara Chicken or Marinara Saghetti would be chicken or pasta cooked in marinara sauce. See these recipes, vegetarian and non-vegetarian.

Marinara derives from the Italian word for sailor, marinaro. Marinara sauce was made in Naples, for the sailors when they returned from the sea. Due to these origins many people think that marinara sauce must contain something from the sea, usually anchovies. This isn’t the case at all, it is pure vegetarian, unless you add something non-vegetarian to it.
It’s a starting point for many Italian recipes, and is spread over pizza.

PHYLO or FILO phyl·lo also fi·lo (fē’lō, fī’-)
n. A pastry dough layered in very thin sheets that become flaky when baked, used especially in Greek and Middle Eastern dishes.

Check this delicious recipe for Spanokopita a delectable Greek Spinach pie.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

EDAMAME

This is a green vegetable that we know more commonly known as a soybean, harvested at the peak of ripening before it reaches the “hardening” time. The word Edamame means “Beans on Branches,” and it grows in clusters on bushy branches. To retain the freshness and its natural flavor, it is parboiled and quick-frozen. In East Asia, mainly Japan, the soybean has been used for over two thousand years as a major source of protein.

Edamame is consumed as a snack, a vegetable dish, used in soups or processed into sweets. As a snack, the pods are lightly boiled in salted water, and then the seeds are squeezed directly from the pods into the mouth with the fingers.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Share

10 Comments »

  1. Comment by Menus Nearu — June 1, 2009 @ 4:40 am

    Great article…..
    There’s a lot of food terms and words.
    That words are new for me. I came to know these words from your blog.Some of the words are really simple, once I learnt them, I will remember this..

  2. Pingback by One-Pot Wonders | The Food Blog — September 23, 2009 @ 11:29 pm

    […] New Foodie Words […]

  3. Comment by Grace Rodriguez — June 22, 2010 @ 11:26 pm

    Does anyone have a complete list of protein foods ?~”*

  4. Comment by L-Tyrosine — December 1, 2010 @ 3:26 pm

    i always visit food blogs because i always like to do some home cooked meals ~.~

  5. Pingback by Supreme Orange Sponge Cake | The Food Blog — May 3, 2011 @ 4:03 am

    […] New Foodie Words […]

  6. Comment by Anne Stanfield — October 20, 2011 @ 7:44 pm

    Hey to everyone out there who is interested in food words…

    I’ve written a little book about words that all things dining, food, culinary….it’s called ‘foodiewords’ Anne Stanfield’s Food & Dining Lexicon. Food and words are two passions of mine. I’d love you to take a look…www.foodiewords.com

    Food for thought….
    Anne Stanfield

  7. Comment by admin — October 20, 2011 @ 9:11 pm

    Thanks Anne. It’s very interesting. I’ll add a link on the site as soon as I can!

  8. Comment by Alba Sotlar — November 25, 2011 @ 10:18 am

    Can I just say what a relief to search out someone who really knows what theyre speaking about on the internet. You undoubtedly know learn how to deliver an issue to gentle and make it important. Extra folks need to learn this and understand this side of the story. I cant imagine youre no more in style since you definitely have the gift.

  9. Comment by Tamala Duverne — December 14, 2011 @ 12:41 pm

    I love forgathering useful info, this post has got me even more info!

  10. Comment by admin — January 2, 2012 @ 9:06 pm

    Thank you for dropping by, though I haven’t really blogged in quite a while.
    Yes I get a lot of spam too, and frankly I just delete or mark it as spam. I’m not really aware of any plugin though I suppose there must be.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a comment